CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | 15th OCTOBER 2019 | CENTRAL LONDON

CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION
15th OCTOBER 2019 | CENTRAL LONDON

Identify your lone workers – not as easy as it sounds!

Sometimes businesses find it hard to identify all of their lone workers, and it is no surprise as this may not be as easy as it sounds. But, failing to identify staff that work alone can have an impact on how the risks associated with lone working are managed and ultimately the safety, security and wellbeing of staff.

We spoke to StaySafe one of our trusted exhibitors and they shared their thoughts and this useful infographic to help you consider those lone workers who may get missed.

When we think of lone workers we usually imagine those working in complete isolation such as a security guard manning a building at night, or a farmer working out in the middle of a field. However, while this may be true for many, lone working doesn’t always mean being completely alone.

Lone workers may very well operate in highly populated areas or alongside clients, customers and members of the public.

Narrowing our definition of lone workers down to those completely in isolation means that many of our employees are not being included in our lone worker policy and are not receiving the level of protection they need as a result.

So, what then constitutes lone working and how can we identify lone workers in our organization?

A lone worker is anyone working without the direct and immediate support of supervisors or colleagues. To put it simply, if an employee cannot be seen or heard by a colleague, they are lone working, whether that be for all or part of their working day.

Identifying your lone workers

Some of your lone workers will be easy to identify by assessing work patterns and roles. However, there may be times where you may not even be aware that your employees are lone working. It may be useful to talk to your employees and ask the below questions to identify any ‘hidden lone workers’ in your organization.

  1. Do colleagues work in different parts of a building or site? E.g. two cleaners working on different floors.
  2. If working on a noisy site, will a colleague be able to see/hear another colleague if they need help?
  3. Do your employees travel alone during working hours?
  4. Are there times where employees working as pairs will be separated? E.g. taking separate lunch breaks.
  5. Will any of your employees be left working alone if a colleague is
    on leave?
  6. Are there times where an employee is left to staff the shop floor alone?
  7. Are single employees left working late in the office or other work sites?

Once lone working practices have been identified, it is important that you risk assess each of these situations and put measures in place to ensure your employees are safe.

Understanding the risks

There are of course different risks associated with the level of isolation that comes with lone working. Those out in a remote and completely isolated location are more exposed to environmental risks that could lead to an accident, while those working alongside members of the public or in client’s home are at higher risk of experiencing violence and aggression.

If this article has whet your appetite and helped you think about how to identify your lone workers, come along and talk to StaySafe and our other trusted exhibitors on the 15th October. They will be there alongside our fabulous speakers and experts all willing to offer their support and guidance.

If you haven’t got your tickets and secured your place, there is still time. Just visit our registration page, check out which delegate rate applies to you and book your place today!